HBL Interviews: Second Dimension.

HBL

Thank you for agreeing to our interview, please take a moment to tell us a little about you and the team?

Adam

Thanks for having me! Aside from running Second Dimension, I’m also a database admin and application developer during the day, and have gotten back into card games and tabletop games in more recent years. As for the team – for day to day operations, it’s just me, but for development, there’s a few teams I’m involved with for a few different projects.

HBL

What was the first game you created?

Adam

For the retro scene? Hangman SG. Previous games were just small little demos and learning tools for DOS, but nothing notable or worth mentioning.

HBL

What do you for a living away from game creation?

Adam

I’m a database administrator and application developer. Nothing exciting to mention here. I don’t make games there, so who cares? 😛

HBL

What’s the reason behind the name Second Dimension?

Adam

There’s a friend of mine on NintendoAge that I discuss misc business things with, and when I started to move away from the Airwalk Studios moniker, I was looking for suggestions on what to call the business while still having a name that fit what I was doing. My friend suggested Second Dimension, and it just stuck.

HBL

What’s your mission statement at Second Dimension?

Adam

To bring the best quality product and experience at an affordable price. I also try to provide the best customer service and support as possible. All customers and users are important, so I want to make sure everyone has a pleasant experience, or at least provide the best possible experience I can.

HBL

Are you surprised with the resurgence in retro gaming?

Adam

If you asked me this back in 2010 – 2012 time, I would’ve said yes. Today? Not so much. It just makes sense from both a consumer side and business stance – these classic games were amazing back then, and you know what? They’re still amazing today. It’s so cheap to distribute these games digitally or via emulation boxes like the NES and SNES Classics that it was only a matter of time until Nintendo jumped into the game, followed by Sony.

HBL

Which one of your games are you the proudest of and why?

Adam

That’s a tough one – every game that I worked on always added something new to my knowledge or tested my skills at the time. I think the one that I’m most fond of, though, would be Handy Harvy as it was the first game I programmed in SecondBASIC, the compiler I had created.

HBL

Which game has caused or is causing you the most headaches?

Adam

Handy Harvy had a rough go. I had started the project with BEX, but due to a bug once the source code reached a certain size, it became difficult to make any real progression. This problem couldn’t be fixed due to the author of BEX basically abandoning the project, so the only alternative I had, if I wanted to finish the game, was to make SecondBASIC.

HBL

Do you have any games that are just sitting on your drives unfinished that you may release one day?

Adam

Not only do I have some unfinished games that aren’t released, I also have finished games that aren’t released! The finished games will definitely see the light of day. I do intend on finishing the unfinished games, but it may be difficult to find the time for some of them.

HBL

Can you tell us what prompted you to get involved in Retro Game Development?

Adam

I saw there were a few titles being released, or close to release (Pier Solar, Battle Kid) back near the end of 2010, and thought “I wonder if I could do that”. I started researching some development across all of the consoles and eventually settled on the Genesis in early 2011.

HBL

What games at the time (and now) would you say are your biggest inspirations?

Adam

Easily the NES Mega Man series, a lot of Capcom’s other titles (Duck Tales, Rescue Rangers, Darkwing, etc)., and Final Fantasy and Dragon Warrior are definitely the reasons why I fell in love with gaming. There’s really just so many that have captivated me over the years and gave me gaming experiences that I hope to reproduce and share with others.

HBL

What is the biggest challenge you face with the limitations of the hardware, particularly as you continue to expand features title-to-title? (Memory? Graphical capability? Speed?)

Adam

The biggest challenge I face with anything with retro development is the holes in knowledge I have. Fortunately there’s a strong community to help with these gaps in knowledge. Working within the limitations of the hardware is why I love retro development.

HBL

Do you have timelines built into the management of these games?

Adam

At first there wasn’t a whole lot of time management, mainly because it was just me or minimal assets required. Now that projects are starting to increase in scope and complexity, time management is essential. The team has to agree on a schedule and aim for those goals and milestones, so it can get stressful at times.

HBL

Any thoughts about doing games on other systems?

Adam

There’s always the possibility! It’s hard to say what the future will hold, but as long as we’re making games, I’m happy.

HBL

What’s next?

Adam

Project Halloweenville! I’m really excited to be working with Jav from Retro Nerve on this project and I think we’re on a good path to a fun game. That’s the hope anyway! Also, Kromasphere is on the horizon. We’re finishing up some of the materials, final testing, and so on, but it’s close to release.

HBL

Are you open for people approaching you to publish their games, can you tell us about that process and how they get in contact with you?

Adam

Yes, in fact, I’ve published a few titles in the past for folks (Bomb on Basic City, NES Virus Cleaner, and soon to be Kromasphere). The process is fairly straight forward:
* Send an email with a demo of your game (you can send full, but I prefer that it’s just a demo until a deal is made)
* The demo is then reviewed, and if it’s something that feels at home with the other games Second Dimension offers, negotiations begin
* Once both parties agree to the terms, I will test the finished product for several hours a day for a week to ensure the game is flawless of bugs and can be completed, and then the process of manufacturing begins.

Finally

Huge thanks to Adam for chatting to us, be sure to keep popping back for more info on  Adam and his Second Dimension games.

 

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